Children receiving school lunch

Children receiving school lunch
1980198119821983198419851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120122013201420152016196919701971197219731974197519761977197819792017
Children receiving school lunch26,600,00025,800,00022,900,00023,000,00023,400,00023,600,00023,700,00023,900,00024,200,00024,200,00024,100,00024,200,00024,600,00024,900,00025,300,00025,700,00025,900,00026,300,00026,600,00027,000,00027,300,00027,500,00028,000,00028,400,00029,000,00029,600,00030,100,00030,600,00031,000,00031,300,00031,800,00031,800,00031,700,00030,700,00030,500,00030,500,00030,400,00019,400,00022,400,00024,100,00024,400,00024,700,00024,600,00024,900,00025,600,00026,200,00026,700,00027,000,00030,000,000
Children receiving school lunch

ABOUT THIS DATASET

Any child at a participating school may purchase a meal through the National School Lunch Program. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free meals. Those with incomes between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level are eligible for reduced‐price meals, for which students can be charged no more than 40 cents. (For the period July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2014, 130 percent of the poverty level is $30,615 for a family of four; 185 percent is $43,568 .) Children from families with incomes over 185 percent of poverty pay a full price, though their meals are still subsidized to some extent. Local school food authorities set their own prices for full‐price (paid) meals, but must operate their meal services as non‐profit programs.
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